Tachi Uchi No Kurai


I mentioned in a previous post that I enjoy Iaido, but can’t put why into words yet. Apparently there is a word for that and it is alexithymia.

Once per month, my club does “Tachi Uchi No Kurai”. We worked on the Koryū set on Sunday, which has 10 kata as part of it. The 10 are named as follows:

1. Ippon-me Deai
2. Nihon-me Tsukekomi
3. Sanbon-me Ukenagashi
4. Yonhon-me Ukekomi
5. Gohon-me Tsukikage
6. Ropon-me Suigetsutō
7. Nanahon-me Zetsumyōken
8. Hachihon-me Dokumyōken
9. Kyuhon-me Shinmyōken
10. Juppon-me Uchikomi

Tachi Uchi No Kurai is partner practice done with a Bokuto (wooden sword).

During Ukenagashi I was working with one of our new members, and he blocked somewhat correctly then moved his sword for some reason and I nailed him in the head due to the tension of my sword against the tension of his block, which suddenly disappeared. I think he learned what not to do when blocking.

We worked on 1 through 3. Here is a video that shows the set. It may not be exactly the way we do it since some elements may have been tweaked by the governing body since the time this video was made.

We don’t wear any protection while practicing Tachi Uchi No Kurai at my dojo.

We also practiced cutting newspaper with our bokuto. That was neat. With proper technique, you can get a cut that is close to a metal blade. It’s not about speed or force. The more speed or force used, the worse the cut. I was successful with the grain, but not against it.

-Roy Iaidoka

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